• Data Economy

    Safe Harbour ruling: A fierce storm with no lighthouse in sight

    The new Safe Harbour ruling has shown the difficulties in adapting existing legal rules to the globalised, digital era. Online privacy legislation is clashing with modern business models, while European regulators are struggling to balance citizen rights [read more]
    byClaudia La Donna | 26/Oct/20153 min read
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    The new Safe Harbour ruling has shown the difficulties in adapting existing legal rules to the globalised, digital era. Online privacy legislation is clashing with modern business models, while European regulators are struggling to balance citizen rights with the desire to boost the competitiveness of the tech industry.

     

    If someone were asked to guess which issue has generated the fiercest debate in Brussels in the recent months, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) Safe Harbour ruling should be the answer. Brussels has not stopped talking about it since the 6th October. Safe Harbour, which echoes a secure environment, no longer fits with the legal uncertainty and insecurity that the ruling has generated.

    The ECJ ruled that the transatlantic Safe Harbour agreement, which allows American companies to use a single standard for consumer privacy and data transfer of private information between the EU and the US, is invalid.

    With its ruling the ECJ has considerably challenged, if not disrupted this framework put in place to ease Trans-Atlantic information sharing, deeming it inadequate, especially in light of the surveillance allegations and scandals by USA intelligence services (including the NSA).

    The upshot of the ruling is that there are now only limited pan-EU rules on data flow from Europe to the USA.

    The ECJ has caused quite a stir in the tech world with its recent judgment. Tech companies, big and small, are scrambling to see what data they process and where it is transferred. Most multinationals are now legally obliged to suspend any transfer of its customers’ data to the USA and move their data storage and operations to an EU subsidiary.

    Has anyone also quantified the economic implications of a real stop of data transfer between the EU and the USA? A power-generated black out is the best example I can think of.

    The European Commission has therefore been put in a tough position. While it has to support the ruling by the European Court of Justice and guarantee citizens’ privacy, it had evoked the ire of the ICT industry. Trade and business associations are lobbying for a pragmatic solution namely via a transition period that would legalise the current Trans-Atlantic data flows.

    The Commission has also promised guidelines for companies and data processors by early November and is working together with the national authorities to prevent fragmentation. But industry fears that this will not prevent headaches, stress and costs. A German data protection authority, for instance, has already warned it would fine non-compliant companies severely.

    Meanwhile, Europe and the USA have also been negotiating a renewed Safe Harbour agreement. The ruling comes in the midst of these talks and will be an extra source of pressure. However, little can be done to accommodate the ruling unless America agrees to suspend its surveillance mechanisms on EU citizen data, which would be a very big ask.

    In summary, the new Safe Harbour ruling has shown the difficulties in adapting existing legal rules to the globalised, digital era. Online privacy legislation is clashing with modern business models, while European regulators try to balance citizen rights with the desire to boost its tech industry and remain competitive. It’s a fierce storm with no lighthouse in sight.

     

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  • A conversation with

    Ramon Tremosa: Europe is not at war with US innovation

    One of the key points of the Google antitrust case in Europe is that there are also US companies among the complainants, which contradicts the argument that the EU is adopting a protectionist approach against US innovation, argues MEP Ramon Tremosa. &nbs [read more]
    byThe Digital Post | 06/Oct/201510 min read
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    One of the key points of the Google antitrust case in Europe is that there are also US companies among the complainants, which contradicts the argument that the EU is adopting a protectionist approach against US innovation, argues MEP Ramon Tremosa.

     

    Have you had any second thoughts about the “Google break-up” motion?

     

    Are we sure Europe is not waging a “protectionist” war against US tech giants as many critics argue?

     

    Ms Vestager has taken an hard line on the Google case. After the first SO sent in April, what do you expect she will do in the following months?

     

    Some critics insist that it remains difficult to determine an anti-competitive behavior in the online search business. What is your view about that?

     

    US tech giants, including Google, are investing more and more millions to influence the European policy. What is your opinion about that?

     

    Ramon Tremosa i Balcells is a Democratic Convergence of Catalonia politician - The Liberal Party in the current government of Cataluña. He follows the Economic and International Trade committee in the EP as well as the USA and Israel Dele. He has a special interest in economics, transport, logistics, trade and competition cases, in particular in the digital market field and the Google antitrust case.

     

    photo credit: brett jordan
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