• Future of the Internet

    globe-2

    The Internet Governance Forum enters its second decade

    The 10-year extension of the IGF mandate is a testament to the IGF’s significant evolution over the past decade as the leading global forum for dialogue on Internet governance issues. What's next? As the Internet continues to evolve at breakneck speed, [read more]
    byNigel Hickson | 21/Dec/20166 min read
    FacebookTwitterGoogle+WhatsAppEvernotePocketKindle ItBufferLinkedIn
    x
    Bookmark

    The 10-year extension of the IGF mandate is a testament to the IGF’s significant evolution over the past decade as the leading global forum for dialogue on Internet governance issues. What’s next?

    As the Internet continues to evolve at breakneck speed, many critical issues still need to be addressed. A major area is Internet governance. This broad realm encompasses both governance of the Internet (essentially the business of ICANN and other technical organizations) and governance on the Internet (a range of issues affecting services and content, such as privacy and cybersecurity).

    Last year, the U.N. General Assembly approved the renewal of the mandate of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) for another 10 years. Born in Tunis at the end of the second phase of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), the IGF has evolved to serve as the leading global forum for dialogue on Internet governance issues. Since the first forum in 2016, the IGF has been an annual event.

    The IGF now gathers a growing number of experts from academia, civil society, governments, industry and the technical community. Traditional topics of Internet governance involve setting rules, standards, policies and providing technical support so that the world can be connected on the global Internet. Going beyond the technical issues, the IGF also deals with complex social, economic and transnational issues related to the use of the Internet.

    Getting to where we are today has been both a challenging and rewarding journey that is still in progress.

    The IGF has gone through times of skepticism about both its continued existence and its ability to fulfill its mandate. Over time, the IGF has gradually expanded beyond its narrow circle as a “discussion only” forum to include processes that can produce tangible and useful outcomes, seen in the Best Practices Forums (BPF) and the Dynamic Coalitions. The 10-year extension of the IGF mandate is a testament to the IGF’s significant evolution over the past decade.

    Earlier this month, over 2000 participants from 83 countries came together in Guadalajara, Mexico, with hundreds more participating remotely, to attend the 11th IGF meeting, the first since the mandate’s renewal.

    As in previous years, ICANN’s Board directors, community leaders and senior staff attended the IGF. But unlike past years, the role of ICANN and the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) functions did not take center stage in Guadalajara.

    This is thanks to the Internet community that worked hard over the past few years to finalize the transition of the U.S. Government’s stewardship of the IANA functions to the global multistakeholder community. Instead, this year’s debate was focused on lessons learned from the IANA transition as a recent and successful example of a multistakeholder process in action.

    With over 200 sessions, the 2016 IGF agenda covered the standard topics of Internet governance such as access, diversity, privacy and cybersecurity; plus more current issues related to online trade, the Internet of Things (IoT) and the U.N.’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

    Links between SDGs, Internet governance and the IGF figured strongly on the agenda, with a main session and several other workshops organized on this topic. A common sentiment this year was that the IGF should focus more on the SDGs; a stance that was conveyed clearly during the “Taking Stock” session on the last day.

    ICANN’s participation at IGF 2016 was led by CEO Göran Marby and Board Chair Stephen Crocker. Primary objectives were to emphasize the successful IANA stewardship transition as an example of how ICANN’s multistakeholder processes work, and to encourage participation in the ongoing work of ICANN’s Supporting Organizations and Advisory Committees.

    ICANN’s goals are to continue supporting the multistakeholder model in Internet governance and contributing to global policy discourse with all interested parties – activities that are within ICANN’s mission and scope.

    On the day before the event, ICANN organized a town hall session to reflect on the evolution of ICANN’s multistakeholder processes using the IANA stewardship transition as a case study. Presenters sought views from participants on their experiences with ICANN and how they envisage the challenges ahead.

    In addition, ICANN community and organization staff planned and conducted workshops and roundtable discussions on a variety of topics such as the IANA transition, the new generic top-level domain (gTLD) Program, the role of noncommercial users in ICANN, law enforcement in the online world, and Asia and the next billion Internet users.

    So, what’s next?

    Geneva will host the 2017 IGF next December, and already discussions about strategic focus are underway. Holding the event in Geneva, the second home of the U.N. and to 192 government missions, may boost the participation of governments from developing countries and of non-U.S. businesses, both issues at Guadalajara.

    The IGF Multistakeholder Advisory Group (MAG) will meet early in the new year to determine the focus for the 2017 IGF. At the top of the agenda will be how to deal with the call made by many in Guadalajara for more attention to meeting the targets of the SDGs. No doubt, the MAG may want to concentrate on other issues like human rights and global trade accords.

    After all, the U.N. Human Rights Council meets in Geneva, and the World Trade Organization (WTO) is based there. Once the focus is set, preparatory work can begin for the Geneva IGF.

    All in all, 2017 will be an interesting year in furthering key goals in Internet governance.

     

    Picture credits: kvitlauk
    FacebookTwitterGoogle+WhatsAppEvernotePocketKindle ItBufferLinkedIn
    x
    Bookmark
  • Telecoms

    telephone

    Dominique Leroy: Let telecoms operators speak with one voice in Europe

    The way the telecoms industry is represented in Europe is still too weak and fragmented, says Proximus CEO Dominique Leroy in a conversation with The Digital Post on the sidelines of the iMinds annual conference. Her main suggestion for the revision of th [read more]
    byThe Digital Post | 27/May/20166 min read
    FacebookTwitterGoogle+WhatsAppEvernotePocketKindle ItBufferLinkedIn
    x
    Bookmark

    The way the telecoms industry is represented in Europe is still too weak and fragmented, says Proximus CEO Dominique Leroy in a conversation with The Digital Post on the sidelines of the iMinds annual conference. Her main suggestion for the revision of the telecom framework: more regulatory focus on services than technology.

    The Digital Post: Let’s start from Internet of Things. Proximus is the first operator in Belgium, and one of the first in Europe, that launched a network for Internet of Things. What is it about?

    Dominique Leroy: Historically, telecoms were always about connecting people. More and more in the future, they will also play a key role in connecting things. Against this background, what we did is not so much building a simple network, but setting up a whole end-to-end ecosystem to enable the Internet of Things. We are providing enterprises, consumers as well as developers an end-to-end system equipped with sensors and based on LoRa networks, a long-range and low-power type of networks that connects sensors without SIM cards.

    The purpose is to get small packets of data from the sensors through the LoRa networks and store them in our data centers on a platform called MyThings, where we already provide data analytics. The idea is then to open the platform to developers so that they can develop new applications. There are certain domains where we would like to go all the way up to creating applications, mainly in the mobility field, where we think that we can really bring an added value through Internet of Things.

    So as you see, the Internet of Things opens up a whole new ecosystem. It is more than a utility provided by telcos. We want to offer solutions, partnerships, we are opening up to other players and therefore we are creating innovation. We are also one of the first companies in the sector moving in this direction.

    TDP: Privacy and security are two big challenges for the IoT. What is your view?iMinds_0

    DL: That’s probably where telco operators have a real added value considering their knowhow: We already provide end-to-end security over our infrastructures, from your phone to the applications you use, all the way to our datacentres. This expertise is very important for tomorrow’s connectivity in cars, home automation and health. LoRa networks come already with a triple encryption key. They secure the sensor identification, the payload and the network. In general, when it comes to using certification, identification and authorization technologies I believe that is where we provide a lot of added value.

    TDP: How do you see telecoms operators capitalizing on the Internet of Things in, say, five years from now?

    DL:  Data consumption today is driven mainly by millions of people connecting with each other. Data consumption will increase dramatically in the coming years as billions of connected devices go on-line. This new reality will create huge volumes of data traffic.  IoT will thus become an important piece of the telcos ecosystems, leading to more investment in infrastructures, stimulating more innovation, value, and opportunities for new revenue streams and profit.

    TDP: The European commission is working on new proposals to implement greater coordination at European level of radio-spectrum policies. Unfortunately, in the past similar legislative moves were met with strong scepticism from member states. Why this time should be different?

    DL: I don’t think member states want to give to Europe their powers on spectrum policy. But they very much understand that if they want to develop a coherent European digital market, there needs to be some coordination. The repurposing of 700 MHz for Wireless Broadband Services should be done within a certain timeframe all over Europe, otherwise it wouldn’t work. If tomorrow we need much higher frequency bandwidth, for instance to be able to develop 5G and self-driving cars, some sort of European coordination is essential to get there.

    Moreover, a more consistent policy all over Europe should be applied to the length of licenses. These actions are all feasible, and I think member states will in a way or another agree that’s the right path. However, what they won’t allow is that the EU decide on the prices for the spectrum. In any case, I think that we have an opportunity to have more coordination in terms of timing of the auctions and duration of spectrum licenses.

    TDP: What should be the main priorities of the forthcoming proposal on the revision of the EU telecoms framework?

    DL

    DL: We definitely need less regulation to be able to catch up with more competitive markets. In the last 20 years, Europe has been very effective in overseeing the liberalization of the industry securing a high level of competition. However, today if you look at the big players in the industry, either they come from America, or more and more from Asia. Regulation is certainly one of the root causes of not having strong European digital players.

    So, let’s make sure that we deregulate as much as possible, and let competition drive investments and spur innovation. Levelling the playing field is also another important aspect. It is not acceptable anymore that telcos are subjected to obligations on, say, privacy, data usage, or interoperability that are not applying to players operating the same services. The problem today is that regulation is focusing too much on technology and not on services, which produce lot of inconsistencies between cable, telecom, OTT operators providing the same services. So my recipe could be summarized in three elements: less regulation, more level playing field, more regulatory focus on services than technology.

    TDP: A word on the increasingly tough stance of Margrethe Vestager on Mergers & Acquisitions?

    DL: I think we as an industry need to articulate better what we want, what are the risks of preventing telcos from growing in scale, and what is acceptable and what not. We are not very well-structured and every too often we shy away from speaking with one voice. That also explains why it is easier for regulators to take their own direction: we do not make enough efforts to be listened. We can blame regulators or politicians but I think we should also look at ourselves and see how we can be more united to defend our industry. The way we are represented in Europe is still too weak and fragmented.

     

     

    Picture credits: Matt Brajlih
    FacebookTwitterGoogle+WhatsAppEvernotePocketKindle ItBufferLinkedIn
    x
    Bookmark
  • Startup Economy

    Markus1

    To the ‘Point’: A talk with Minut co-founder Marcus Ljungblad

    One of the most remarkable crowd-fuding stories of the last years comes from Sweden. The Digital Post talks with Minut co-founder Marcus Ljungblad about how his project Point made a splash on Kickstarter.   The Digital Post: Behind “Point“ [read more]
    byThe Digital Post | 12/Apr/20164 min read
    FacebookTwitterGoogle+WhatsAppEvernotePocketKindle ItBufferLinkedIn
    x
    Bookmark

    One of the most remarkable crowd-fuding stories of the last years comes from Sweden. The Digital Post talks with Minut co-founder Marcus Ljungblad about how his project Point made a splash on Kickstarter.

     

    The Digital Post: Behind “Point“ there is an outstanding crowd-funding story. Tell us more.

    Marcus Ljungblad: Although we founders, Nils Mattisson, Martin Lööf, Fredrik Ahlberg and I are all from Sweden, we actually started out in Shenzhen, China. By the time we arrived in China we had put together a working prototype of a connected fire alarm. But no first prototype survives contact with  user testing.

    Marcus

    On the ground in Shenzhen, we were able to utilise the enormous eco-system to rapidly prototype and test different ideas—those who survived ultimately lead to Point. We knew we were on to something when, during a customer interview, the customer asked to buy one of the products then and there.

    At that time we didn’t even know if it could be mass produced, let alone had we given Point its name. Fast-forward a couple of weeks and we launched on Kickstarter.

    Over the next 30 days we raised almost 5x our goal and had received customers from every continent all across the world.

    After the crowdfunding campaign ended we headed back directly to Shenzhen to get to establish the supply-chains we needed and to get Point to production. Today we are shipping our first batch, which is all sold out, to more than 2000 customers and we are a week from producing the second batch.

     

    The Digital Post: What is Point about? How does it work?

    ML: As apartment owners ourselves we felt there is a disconnect between us and our homes when we weren’t there. How can I know everything is OK at home when I’m away? Point is camera-free option to stay informed about the important things when you are away.

    Did my fire alarm go off? Has there been unexpected noise? Or, if I rent out my home, how do I know that no one is smoking inside or staying quiet during late hours? Point uses a range of sensors and combines a lot environment data to inform users when something is amiss.

    Everything is computed on Point, so no sensitive information ever leaves your home. It’s dead-simple to install and is designed to blend-in into any home. 

     

    The Digital Post: What should be improved in Europe to help young startups?

    ML: Make it easier to offer shares and options to the earliest employees in the company. It is not only the founders who contribute to a company’s success, your first hires and are equally important and you want to reward them accordingly. While starting out, however, it is often expensive to compensate on salary only.

    Shares and options offers a way to reward your employees if the company does well. A reward they are rightly entitled to! We’d love to see governments in Europe make it easier for startup founders to share their success with their employees.

     

    The Digital Post: Can Europe match the success of Silicon Valley and Shenzen? What should be the ingredients?

    ML: The aim should not be to compete with Silicon Valley or Shenzhen, these are unique ecosystems and they are extremely good at what they do already. Rather, Europe as a whole, should spend its energy doing what it does best: nurturing companies that start global from day one.

    Sweden is an important market for us. Users are connected and it has an tech friendly culture. But it is too small on it’s own. If we want to truly affect users relationships with their homes we need to look beyond Sweden.The EU should continue to focus on lowering the barriers to entry to other European markets.

    Soon every new company will be ready to take on the much larger, and much much more diverse, global market. And it can do so faster than it’s American and Chinese counterparts. Europe is small, diverse and open, we should use that to our advantage to compete—not to become another Silicon Valley or Shenzhen.

     

    Photos Credit: Iwan Gabovitchhttps
    FacebookTwitterGoogle+WhatsAppEvernotePocketKindle ItBufferLinkedIn
    x
    Bookmark
  • Startup Economy

    Connected Cars-2

    Connected cars, (more) developers wanted

    As the Internet of Things takes off the market for connected car will rapidly expand. GSMA estimates that every car will have some type of connection by 2025. This means that more and more developers are poised to enter the automotive space. The demand f [read more]
    bySophie Mestchersky | 15/Jan/20155 min read
    FacebookTwitterGoogle+WhatsAppEvernotePocketKindle ItBufferLinkedIn
    x
    Bookmark

    As the Internet of Things takes off the market for connected car will rapidly expand. GSMA estimates that every car will have some type of connection by 2025. This means that more and more developers are poised to enter the automotive space.

    The demand for constant connectivity spreads to many industry sectors and the automotive sector is no exception to this trend. Our cars have become central hub not just for transportation, but also for communication.

    According to Alec Saunders, a technology ecosystem, platform and developer relations leader, “people want uninterrupted connectivity and intelligent personalisation, and this experience is now moving into a new medium – the car.” Developers ought to be on the cutting edge of this rapidly growing market, and car manufacturers have eagerly started recruiting.

    As consumer expectations evolve, the market for connected cars will rapidly expand. A 2013 forecast by GSMA found every car will have some type of connection by 2025. Furthermore, the market for technology to connect cars was an estimated $18 billion in 2012 and is expected to increase three times that number in the next four years worldwide.

    Our research shows that more than just expectations are changing.

    [Tweet “Road safety will also soon become a factor in connected car development.”]

    Think about the risks we take during all manual tasks, such as reaching for a phone, dialing, and texting while driving. As vehicles become more connected, standardising interfaces and reducing the amount of time needed to take a driver’s eyes off the road becomes important.

    Liz Kerton, the Executive Director of the Autotech Council, says: “A car that drives itself is 90% software and 10% hardware. We’re about 70% software now, so you could say there are many opportunities still out there.” Liz’s aim is to connect car manufacturers with entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, and suppliers.

    Nowadays, drivers can unlock their cars, check the status of their batteries, find where they parked, and remotely activate the climate control system. With more and more developers entering the automotive space, this is just the beginning.

    Learn more in our white paper, “Automotive as a Microcosm of IoT.

    FacebookTwitterGoogle+WhatsAppEvernotePocketKindle ItBufferLinkedIn
    x
    Bookmark
  • Data Economy

    Ajit

    IoT: The great opportunity for Telcos

    By 2020, we are expected to have 50 billion connected devices. Will European Telecoms firms monetize the explosive growth of Internet of Things? The next five years will be critical. In the long term, much may depend on the development of 5G technology. [read more]
    byAjit Jaokar | 15/Dec/20144 min read
    FacebookTwitterGoogle+WhatsAppEvernotePocketKindle ItBufferLinkedIn
    x
    Bookmark

    By 2020, we are expected to have 50 billion connected devices. Will European Telecoms firms monetize the explosive growth of Internet of Things? The next five years will be critical. In the long term, much may depend on the development of 5G technology.

    Like many memes which originate in the web domain (for example Web 2.0), Big Data has an impact on the Telecoms industry. However, unlike Web 2.0 (which is mostly based on the advertising business model), Big Data has wider implications for many domains (for example healthcare, transportation etc).

    The term Big Data is now (2014) quite mature. But its impact is yet to be felt across many verticals over the next few years. While Telecoms is also a vertical, it is also an enabler of value for many industries. Hence, there are many areas where Telecoms will interplay with Big Data.

    Based on my teaching at Oxford University and the City Sciences program at UPM – Technical University of Madrid – Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, I propose that the value of Big Data for Telecoms lies in IoT (Internet of Things)

    IoT is huge, but how huge?

    [Tweet “By 2020, we are expected to have 50 billion connected devices”]

    To put in context: The first commercial citywide cellular network was launched in Japan by NTT in 1979. The milestone of 1 billion mobile phone connections was reached in 2002. The 2 billion mobile phone connections milestone was reached in 2005. The 3 billion mobile phone connections milestone was reached in 2007. The 4 billion mobile phone connections milestone was reached in February 2009.

    So, 50 billion by 2020 is a massive number, and no one doubts that number any more. But IoT is really all about Data and that makes it very interesting for the Telcos. Data is important, but increasingly it is also freely available.

    Customers are willing to share data. Cities are adopting Open Data initiatives. Big Data itself is based on the increasing availability of Data. IoT is expected to add a huge amount of data too.

    But, who will benefit from it and how?

    There is a phrase variously attributed to Oil Magnate J Paul Getty – ‘The meek shall inherit the earth, but not its mining rights’. In other words, Data will be free, available and Open, but someone will make money out of it. No doubt, the web players and various start-ups will all monetize this data. But how will Telecoms?

    [Tweet “Looking at the business case for Big Data and IoT, the next five years are critical for Telecoms.”]

    Here’s why. IoT connectivity will come in two forms: Local area connectivity and Wide area connectivity. Bluetooth 4.0 and iBeacon will provide the local area connectivity. We can expect that from 2015 onwards – most devices retailers will support Bluetooth 4.0.

    But the wide area connectivity will still need 5G deployment, which is also the most logical candidate for wide area IoT connectivity. And therein lies the value and business case for Big Data for Telecoms: 5G will be needed to connect the ‘IoT islands’ over the next years.

    Will Telecoms monetize IoT ?

    Time will tell. Specifically the next five years since most analysts predict that 5G deployments will take place in 2020 and beyond.

    FacebookTwitterGoogle+WhatsAppEvernotePocketKindle ItBufferLinkedIn
    x
    Bookmark