• Innovation

    Why digital skills are the currency of future societies

    One of the key instruments we need to boost digital skills are partnerships on all levels and between all stakeholders - business, schools universities, research centres and the institutions. "A remarkable new invention can’t transform society until so [read more]
    byEva Paunova | 10/Jan/20173 min read
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    One of the key instruments we need to boost digital skills are partnerships on all levels and between all stakeholders – business, schools universities, research centres and the institutions.

    “A remarkable new invention can’t transform society until society has learned how to use it effectively”, writes Ryan Avent who is the economics editor of the Economist and together with whom we took part in a key event that launched the Digital Skills and Jobs Coalition.

    The Coalition is a tiny little revolution within the digital revolution that marks the understanding of all business sectors, and not only the ICT companies, that digital skills are the currency of the future societies.

    According to predictions made by the International Data Corporation, by 2020, 50 percent of the G2000 (The Forbes Global 2000 is an annual ranking of the top 2,000 public companies in the world by Forbes magazine) will see that the majority of their business depend on their ability to create digitally enhanced products, services, and experiences.

    Additionally, by year-end 2017, over 70 percent of the G500 will have dedicated digital transformation and innovation teams.

    Already today, 70% of all jobs require at least moderate levels of digital skills – a number that will raise up to 90% in the coming few years.

    In this situation the worst we can do is to leave education systems alone in supplying new, skilled labour force for the current demand.

    That is why one of the instruments we need are partnerships on all levels and between all stakeholders – business, schools universities, research centres and the institutions.

    As we have experienced in the past, labour markets can sustain a lot of digital disruption. Nobody was in favour of innovations back in the day when the industrial revolution was happening.

    Although some industries were worse off, those who did innovate back then, were the ones who later were in need of new type of labour force.

    This new demand made people start skilling up themselves and applying for the new type of work. This is why I think we need to invest in skills and partnerships between businesses, schools and universities and policy-makers, so we align the supply and demand of skilled workers. This is the way we can make the best out of the occurring transition.

     

    Picture credits: clement127

     

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